Why you shouldn’t give a flying hoot about the brand of tablet you have

Does it really matter what tablet you have? The answer to this question is quickly becoming ‘No’ and here’s why.

 

Lenovo s6000

At the very onset of the iPad there were numerous cheap rip-offs hitting the market. Brands like Blaupunkt and Sansui jumped on the tablet bandwagon and provided poor display and not-so-calibrated touch screen technology on their devices. They sold for a fourth of the price and were, to put it mildly, useless pieces of junk. The only competitor in the global market that provided an outstanding, slightly cheaper alternative was Samsung with the Galaxy Tab.

There was one common denominator however that allowed for the current surge of good tablets that are reasonably priced to hit the market. This is undoubtedly Andriod operating systems. While an iPad still leads in terms of display with its Retina liquid crystal display that always seems more brighter and vivid than any other tablet you have seen, the Android operating system in combination with a fairly good display provides any user with fantastic tools to do whatever tasks they need.

When Google Play opened its doors to all consumers worldwide, it offered a plethora of apps for free, a project that has now integrated itself into the lives and businesses of millions of people worldwide. By the end of 2013 there were an estimated 285 million tablet users worldwide. Not too shabby, given that many of these people already have desktops that can do even more than the small square of circuitry they can hold in their hands or put in their handbags.

Today, cheaper brands have improved their display and technology and provide great value to tablet users. For those not opting for the status symbol of owning an iPad in Palm Springs and who really want to use their devices for activities other than Angry Birds, Lenovo’s Ideatab s6000, at less than half the price of an iPad, performs beautifully. It is powered by a 1.2GHz quad-core processor with 1GB RAM. The Android Jelly Bean 4.2 OS does everything you would expect from a tablet and its 16GB of internal storage capacity plus a MicroSD capacity of up to 32GBs is quite decent. Tried, tested and worthy of a tick of approval from InfoRocked.


Many tablets like these are giving users smooth operation with zero problems at a fraction of the price. Much praise goes to Android developers for making this happen and innovative companies that bring cheaper technologies that work well to our palms. So, does it really matter what tablet you have? For image, yes, but for those who will actually out them to use, a big, resounding ‘NO’.